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Local hip hop recording artist Aaron 'Godson' Hernandez launches rhymes from the stage last Thursday night as he opened for U.S. pop group Girlicious. - Daron Letts/NNSL photos

In Godson we trust

By Daron Letts
Northern News Services
Published Wednesday, March 18, 2009

SOMBA K'E/YELLOWKNIFE - In the old days, kids at concerts used to hold up lighters during the slow songs. Today, kids hold up camera phones during the fast songs. Beyond that, pop shows don't seem to have changed much in recent decades except for the fact that the music is too loud.

Local hip hop star Aaron 'Godson' Hernandez wound up the mostly teen and pre-teen audience at the opening of last Thursday's Girlicious concert. Many teenagers danced and sang along with the recording artist's Northern rhymes.

Toronto singer Danny Fernandes followed with a short, energetic set. A few fortunate female fans got to take home one of several sweat-soaked towels tossed into the crowd by Fernandes' two go-go boys. Go-go boy number two enjoyed his own Yellowknife souvenir a pink bra hurled on stage. He wore the trophy around his neck for the remainder of the set.

The main attraction seemed not to disappoint kids. Girlicious elicited screams that echoed through the gymnasium as they took the stage. The quartet's athletic dance routines and high-pitched harmonies kept the enthusiasm high throughout the last half of the evening.

The young audience remained well-behaved and was supervised by a large team of adults, who made sure the young people stayed safe during what was probably their first big concert.

Idling vehicles filled with parents lined the parking lot during the end of the night, as the drivers waited in the quiet of their cars to drive the thrilled concert-goers home.